Worldwide focus on timber


 

Timber-frame-building

We live and breathe all things timber here at Ethical Forestry.  Recently, we have been delighted to read about a number of very different, yet very interesting uses of timber.

Firstly, in Dorset, a particularly innovative and beautiful use of timber has been reported in the Daily Mail. Named The Lodge, a timber house has been    constructed using oak-clad pods – each with its own veranda – creating a large and futuristic family home.  With four bedrooms, four bathrooms, a dressing room, an open-plan kitchen, diner, and a sitting room, it is a significant plot of land and is currently for sale for £700,000. The Lodge is testament to a developer who clearly understands the importance of building and living alongside nature – a sentiment we champion here at Ethical Forestry.  The oak trees around which the property has been built are protected and are an incredible 500 years old. 

Secondly, both the United States and New Zealand have announced significant plans to encourage the development of tall timber buildings.  This recognition of not just the importance of timber, but its construction qualities is fantastic news. The White House Rural Council and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have developed plans to support the use of timber in construction.  Driven by a commitment to improving climate-control – one of the most well documented benefits of timber compared to other materials – the initiative has been put in place to encourage engineers, builders and architects to utilise wood as a structural material. America’s Forest Service has invested $1 million and will work alongside WoodWorks, a not-for profit organisation which provides technical support, resources and education around the design of modern wood buildings. To further emphasise a rapidly increasing US awareness of the importance of timber, the USDA has announced plans to launch a competition for entrants to design and demonstrate the architectural and commercial viability of utilising wood in tall buildings. In New Zealand, the New Zealand Green Party has recently offered a $1 million prize to the first company to construct a 10-storey structural timber building in New Zealand. This is a healthy competition with neighbouring Australia, where Forte already exists – the world’s tallest timber apartment building.

Such significant investment in the USA and New Zealand, as well as the creative and thoughtful use of timber in Dorset hopefully demonstrates a world increasing its commitment to more sustainable materials – a message we wholeheartedly support.

To find out more about our timber operations in Costa Rica, please don’t hesitate to call the Ethical Forestry team on 0800 075 3010.